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LATEST NEWS

KINNECTED: What is Kinnected Doing? Part 1

What_is_KINNECTED-_(2).pngACCI Relief’s Kinnected program employs a three-pronged approach towards the goal of reducing the use of residential care and upholding children’s right to grow up in a family.

 

1. KINNECTED PROJECTS

Kinnected has projects operating in 10 different countries, which fall under the following categories:

A. FAMILY PRESERVATION AND ABANDONMENT PREVENTION PROJECTS

These are services that seek to identify families at risk of imminent breakdown and provide intense support services to prevent separation and/or child abandonment.

 

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KINNECTED: What are the Answers? Part 5

What_is_KINNECTED-_(1).pngETHICAL ALTERNATIVES

 

SUPPORT FAMILIES, STRENGTHEN COMMUNITIES.

1. Volunteer in a program that seeks to preserve families and prevent family separation. Volunteers could work with whole families or parents to strengthen their capacity to look after their own children.

2. Volunteer within family reunification programs. Help a family prepare for their child’s return by helping them renovate their house, get access to a water source or set up a small business or a veggie patch.

3. Volunteer in programs run in the community that everyone can access. Examples might be English programs, sports programs, creative workshops or educational support programs.

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KINNECTED: What are the Answers? Part 4

ENCOURAGING ETHICAL VOLUNTEERINGWhat_is_KINNECTED-_(1).png

 

HOW VOLUNTEERS AND VISITORS CAN BEST SUPPORT VULNERABLE CHILDREN

The plight of vulnerable children in the developing world is challenging and moving and stirs many good-hearted people to seek opportunities to volunteer within programs that assist children such as orphanages and shelters. Without careful consideration and awareness of the broader issues, our good intentions could contribute to the exploitation and vulnerability of the children we seek to help. For this reason Kinnected calls for an end to orphanage tourism and volunteering and advocates for ethical alternatives.

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KINNECTED: What are the Answers? Part 3

What_is_KINNECTED-_(1).pngIMPLEMENTING BEST PRACTICE IN THE CARE OF CHILDREN (cont.)

 

PRACTICE FIVE: SMALL FAMILY-LIKE RESIDENTIAL CARE

When all other forms of family and community based care options on the continuum have been deemed not in the best interest of the individual child, then residential care might be the most appropriate option. Preference should be given to small family like facilities that adhere to high standards of care, are legally registered, have qualified staff, good child protection policies, and facilitate the child to continue to participate in community and cultural life outside of the residential care centre.

PRACTICE SIX: SOUND REINTEGRATION AND REUNIFICATION PROGRAMS

All forms of residential care should have a reintegration program that helps each child develop a plan to ensure they are able to be reintegrated into the community as soon as possible. This plan should be developed as soon as a child enters care and should be overseen and monitored by a competent staff member.

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KINNECTED: What are the Answers? Part 2

What_is_KINNECTED-_(1).pngIMPLEMENTING BEST PRACTICE IN THE CARE OF CHILDREN

 

PRACTICE ONE: BE GUIDED BY THE BEST INTERESTS DETERMINATION

Best practice in the care for vulnerable children should always be guided by the principles of the best interests of the child. Services should be designed and offered based on the needs and interests of children, not based on the mandate or vision of an organisation. Services should be designed and delivered with recognition of the broader rights of the child and not unnecessarily cause a rights regression.

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KINNECTED: What are the Answers? Part 1

SHIFTING FROM INSTITUTIONAL TO NON-INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES
FOR CHILDRENWhat_is_KINNECTED-_(1).png

In order to reduce the current over reliance on residential care in developing contexts and better protect children’s right to grow up in a family, we need to scale back institutional services, and increase the availability of non-institutional child welfare services. Implementing this transition is a complex process called ‘deinstitutionalisation’.

 

1. RESPECTING CHILDREN’S RIGHTS AND INVOLVING THEM IN DEINSTITUTIONALISATION

Children (and their families) should be full partners in the transition process. They should be actively involved and consulted in the development, delivery and evaluation of the services they receive and provided with appropriate information in a manner which they can understand.

 

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KINNECTED: What are the Issues? Part 2

2.pngTHE DETRIMENTAL IMPACTS OF ORPHANAGES

60 years of global research has shed light on the detrimental effects that residential care can have on children’s development and overall wellbeing.

The most common adverse effects that children who grow up in residential care experience include:

• Developmental delays

• Behavioural problems

• Attachment disorders

• Lack of life skills

• Institutionalisation

• Difficulty forming and maintaining healthy relationships

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KINNECTED: What are the Issues? Part 1

2.pngOVERUSE OF RESIDENTIAL CARE

A: WHO LIVES IN ORPHANAGES?

Most people believe that children in orphanages are orphans; children, who due to parental death, displacement or abandonment, have no where to live and no one to care for them. Statistics show that this is rarely the case. The reality is that most children in orphanages have living parents. The majority of true orphans don’t live in orphanages but are cared for by their relatives in the community.

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KINNECTED: What is Kinnected?

What_is_KINNECTED-.pngKINNECTED CURRENTLY WORKS IN 10 COUNTRIES TO:

Develop family-based alternative care such as kinship care and foster options for children who require out-of-parental care

Provide high quality short-term care as a last resort and temporary option in cases where family based care is not in the best interests of certain children

Assist long-term residential care programs to undergo deinstitutionalisation, which is the process of closing down long-term residential care programs and developing alternate community-based services for families and children

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A Community Coming Together...

Untitled_design_(17).jpgProject Madagascar continues to provide quality education to over 200 children from some of the poorest suburbs in Madagascar’s capital city, Antananarivo – because every child should have the opportunity to learn, grow and develop skills to enable them to reach their full potential. This project, which is an ACCI RAISE initiative not only provides education and life-skills for young students, but impacts their families and the surrounding communities.

They've seen this as the Parents’ Association continues grow with more parents taking ownership over the work of Project Madagascar’s Centres (CLCs) and their children’s education. The Parent’s Association has been especially active in the last few months in assisting with internal classroom maintenance and organising a fundraising event for continued improvement to the CLCs. 

At CLC Itaosy, a concert was organised to raise funds to fix the main entrance road which is quite inaccessible during the monsoon season.  4,000,000 ariary was collected (equivalent to $1600AUD) for the task and local tradesmen were hired to start the work.

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